Recently published an editorial on the links between gamification and a number of popular health behavior change models, in JMIR Serious Games. The editorial provides a behavioral science view on gamification and health behavior change, describes its principles and mechanisms, and reviews some of the evidence for its efficacy. 

People are complex, smart, and sometimes extremely stubborn, which may explain why in the last two thousand years, nobody has discovered an easy way to shape how people think and behave. Yet in the digital era, we’re witnessing widespread claims, that the secret to winning friends and influencing people, is to reward them with points and badges. A magic solution to engagement or a load of hype—in this article, I’m going to discuss gamification, describe it, judge it, address misconceptions, and advocate when it’s a good or bad idea.

Back in 1936, when Dale Carnegie published his book How to Win Friends and Influence People, he could never have anticipated it would become one of the first bestselling self-help books, selling a huge 15 million (and counting…) copies worldwide. Dale’s classic book on interpersonal communication provides concrete advice on how to handle people—how to encourage them to like you, to win them over to your way of thinking, and how to become an inspiring leader.
How to Win Friends and Influence People… in Social Media To simplify Dale Carnegie’s advice on handling people, we have taken 31 of his principles and merged them into just 10 groups. If Dale were alive today, we’re sure his advice to community managers would look something like this.