Online Research Posts

Gamification: What it is and when to use it

31 October 2013

People are complex, smart, and sometimes extremely stubborn, which may explain why in the last two thousand years, nobody has discovered an easy way to shape how people think and behave. Yet in the digital era, we’re witnessing widespread claims, that the secret to winning friends and influencing people, is to reward them with points and badges. A magic solution to engagement or a load of hype—in this article, I’m going to discuss gamification, describe it, judge it, address misconceptions, and advocate when it’s a good or bad idea.

The United Nations’ Web Network (July 2007)

19 January 2009

In this article, I present a social network map of United Nations websites and tables of website ranking, based on which websites are most and least popular within the network. At the end, I proved some introductory terms used in social network analysis. Then for anyone interested in the process, I have proved a detailed account of the data collection and mapping process. In the summer of 2007, I ran a number of tests and experiments to develop my skills in the application of social network analysis to online data. I’ve posted the background for these studies, and below, you will find an overview of my test on the United Nations network.

Web analytics, behavioural change and Social Return on Investment (SROI)

22 September 2008

In this discussion, we explore the feasibility of applying e-marketing web analytics and concepts to online social marketing interventions and e-Research initiatives. E-marketers frequently use web data, analytics packages and financial measures to optimize websites for customer engagement and sales. Although many online social marketers already use web analytics tools, they do not seem to conduct online social marketing with the same costing and behavioural frameworks used on e-commerce websites. Social marketing is an approach to social change that applies commercial marketing principles to behavioural change interventions such as encouraging environmental protection, public health, safety or community development (Kotler et al., 2002). Frequently drawing upon the 4Ps of marketing—product, price, place, promotion—social marketers frequently use this model as a framework for designing behaviour change interventions (Kotler and Roberto, 1989). Social marketers ‘sell’ behaviours by enhancing the benefits of behavioural ‘products’ and reducing ‘prices’. For example, consider a campaign that aims to encourage composting among home gardeners. The campaign may frame composting (the behaviour) as a good way to enhance ones’ garden (the product’s benefits), and then make composters readily available (reducing time and hassle prices). Online social marketing is the conduct of social marketing over the Internet. Given the conceptual […]